A six-month reprieve is neither compassionate nor merciful—just expedient

DACA presents many problems for Republicans, most of which they created themselves.

From the beginning the program was viewed as an overreach by the former president, and because Republicans like McConnell hated Barack Obama so deeply, the merits of the program came in second to the merits of the person who effected it.

Obama’s popularity and high regard always drove the republicans distracted, and despite numerous legislative stalemates and the inability to overcome the Republicans’ blockage of the last Supreme Court seat, Obama left the White House with an approval rating in the fifties, an almost unprecedented number. (It’s probably higher today, but that doesn’t count.)

And so the elimination of DACA becomes one more cynical attempt to eradicate any vestiges of the Obama presidency, one that has grown more legendary—almost mythical—with every new gaffe from Trump and his clown car of associates. But stuck in the middle are the so-called dreamers, undocumented immigrants who were brought to the United States as children.

Since the beginning of DACA in 2012, 787,580 people have been approved for the program. These applicants had to have arrived in the US before they turned 16 and lived here since June 15 of 2017. The act extended not only to Mexico, but to El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras. Trump famously told them once that they had nothing to worry about. We all should have known that they did.

Of course I would be the last person to cut our supposed president any slack, but his position is being complicated by a number of state attorneys general who have threatened to sue the government if DACA is not rescinded by today, September 5, 2017. Most AGs are sticking to their guns, but Herbert Slatery of Tennessee has changed his mind and withdrawn the threat, claiming the following:

Many of the DACA recipients, some of whose records I reviewed, have outstanding accomplishments and laudable ambitions, which if achieved, will be of great benefit and service to our country. They have an appreciation for the opportunities afforded them by our country.

I cannot expect someone like Donald Trump to think anything through that thoroughly—the only sound echoing in the caverns of his brain are those of his base holding him to his promise to remove rapists and murderers from our streets. Of course he’s not doing that, because he’s not doing anything—saber-rattling at North Korea, empowering racist groups, removing Americans’ health care, and holding “make me feel great again” rallies. Once again it’s up to the Republican Congress—which now has six months to deal with this—to do the right thing.

This same group had seven years to repeal and replace the American Health Care Act. How’d that work out?

The other day I was looking back at the world’s reaction to 9/11. Our country had always engendered mixed emotions from other nations, but that event created an empathetic good will that endured for a long time. But whatever moral high ground we held then has been expunged by the ignorance, vengeance, and downright ignorance of Donald Trump. Now if he wants, he can blame everything on the actions of individual states, but his eradication of DACA diminishes our stature in the world of nations, as it should.

 

Published by

Chuck Radda

I'm a former high school English teacher, currently a literacy volunteer and novelist. I invite your responses right here or to chuckradda@gmail.com. You can also follow me on Facebook and on Twitter—where I tweet annually at @chuckrad45.

One thought on “A six-month reprieve is neither compassionate nor merciful—just expedient”

  1. Of course he’s hoping that the congress will save the Dreamers along with funding the great illegal-alien-thwarting-wall. His art of the deal won’t work with that or with health care, neither will it work with North Korea/China/Russia. Who knew that these things could be so complicated?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s